2015.03.01

Roar Henriksen tested how Citric acid can act as chemical in connection with the removal of rust in the steel components. Ultrasonic cleaner that was used, is a smaller apparatus is purchased on Biltema. This apparatus has a weak heating element, making the heating time long. Hot water, as a mixing Citric acid powder in, was therefore taken from the tap. One tablespoon Citric acid concentrate is mixed with 2- 3 l won, and then filled in the ultrasonic cleaner.

Three crescents, belonging to the aircraft vingemutrer, was first placed in a small container filled with Biltema kaldavfetting. The container was then immersed in the citric acid in the ultrasonic washer. Here stood container 30 minutes, while ultrasonic cleaner was operational.

It is possible and at the same time to have several types of materials up in the scrubber. These may be materials each of which requires different acids / chemicals. The solution is to have, for example,. water for washing the bathroom. In this bathroom a place, one or more, glass containing various kinds of materials and washing chemicals. This method gives a great flexibility at the same time, and that one does not have to empty wash the container to switch to new chemicals.

Parts after cleaning in the ultrasonic wash with citric acid Oppi.

Parts after cleaning in the ultrasonic wash with citric acid Oppi.

After first having been run in 30 minutes in kaldavfetting, was crescents placed directly into the citric acid. Here lay the parts while ultrasonic cleaner was run in 1 time. Temperature in citric acid rose during this period from approximately. 50- to 80 ° C.

Half Moons were then taken out of Citric acid bath, and the last remnants of the washing process was brushed on wire brush. The sections were then applied Lanolin.

2015.02.10

Tor Arthur Andreasen has an extensive experience with taking care of the objects that were recovered from seawater. Having had the leadership of efforts to raise the Heinkel He 115, He has also preserved some parts belonging to the plane.

Storage of parts

It is in the diving community is a common practice to store sjøobjekter in glycol. This anticipating that one can begin to work with the parts.

It is their experience that the glycol has a number of useful properties that make it usable for such use. Glycol has among others. kapillaregenskaper comparable to water. It will therefore relatively quickly pull into the joints. Where it helps to dilute any salt concentrations. Glycol has a high affinity to water, but not evaporate. A reduced evaporation of moisture from a joining, To reduce further the concentration of any corrosive compounds. Over time, the osmosis process do that any salt or acid concentrations migrate through the glycol.

They also have good experiences with the threaded connections held moist using glycol, not stick. They also have good experiences with lacquered objects, which has been several years in the glycol, without this seems to have damaged the paintwork. In contrast, they found that some that some rubbers are soft when stored in glycol.

When the part is ready for further work washed glycol single away using freshwater.

Removal of parts

The next step in preservation is to dismantle an object, as far as practicable, without causing detriment.

Removal of corrosion products

To dissolve corrosion products, they have had as a common practice to add parts of an acid in about. 15 minutes. The type of acid used is again dependent on the form of corrosion products as a wish to remove.

Is the material aluminum they use frequently 85 % acetic acid. This acid is unfortunately very illeluktende-, alternatively bellies they 30 % citric acid solution.

Cooler cleaner is a kind rust fixes. It is produced by DPI, and consists of approximately. 30 % citric acid. It is typically used in a 10- 50 % mix. One advantage with this product is that it dissolves rusty so it is not precipitated elsewhere, and that the material does not rust on while it is in the acid, such that the metal remains glossy finishing.

Is the paint or varnish that one would want to take care of, used often 10 % oksalsyre. This is a kind acid which still functions well in removing rust and various deposits.

The choice of acid will also depend on the type of corrosion products as a want removed. If one wants to remove lime can choose a slightly brutal treatment in a strong acid, like for example. 50 % fosforsyre. This will effectively remove limescale, and generally will not harm metal appreciable. But it is important that one right after the acid treatment is careful to wash away all acid residues.

To wash off the acid remaining after the treatment in the acid bath is often used in the diving environment a product called Blue Gold. This is a product that is kind to aluminum.

The acids used are water soluble and mixes with corrosion products.

Removal of salt

After the process of removing corrosion products are finished, practice they often boil parts 1 hour in water. This is to help reduce the amount of residual salts left in the material.

Evaporation of moisture

After you are finished with the acid is the next step to get vaporized whatever might be of moisture in the material. This is often done by heating section up to 120 ° Celsius. In this temperuren is part of ca. 1 time.

preservative products

The final step is to apply the part surfaces a preservative product. Here the divers often beeswax, alternatively a gun oil, Lanolin or another oil with good preservative properties.

Conservation of parts from Heinkel He 115

Tor Arthur has preserved finishing a Walther flare gun and a badge from one wing root.

Signalpistol
Signal pistol finished conserved

Signal gun was first stored in glycol, then disassembled and washed in 85 % acetic acid / 30 % citric acid. The parts were then boiled in water for about. 1 time, and then dried in an oven at 120 ° C for 1 time. It was finally inserted with a weapon oil, and returned to the museum.

Signs vingerot finished conserved
Signs vingerot finished conserved

Follow signs from the wing root has some corrosion damage. First, this stored glycol. It was then placed in a 85 % acetic acid for about. 15- 20 minutes to be washed away corrosion products. To reduce the amount of salt remaining in the material, it was then boiled in water for about. 1 time. The sign was then heated to approximately. 120° c i ca. 1 hours for drying of the residual moisture. Finally, it was dipped in liquid beeswax, and handed back to the project.

Down below you can see a picture of an aluminum part that is cleaned with acid, boiled in fresh water, dried 120 degrees and then preserved with liquid beeswax.

An aluminum part which is taken up from the sea. The part is rinsed with acid, boiled in fresh water, dried 120 degrees and then preserved with liquid beeswax.

An aluminum part which is taken up from the sea. The part is rinsed with acid, boiled in fresh water, dried 120 degrees and then preserved with liquid beeswax.

The next picture shows a similar aluminum part like the one pictured above. This section has been stored dry, and is not given the same treatment as the corresponding part of the image above.

An aluminum part corresponding to the previous image. This section has been left dry for two years without having been treated by the above of said preservation process.

An aluminum part corresponding to the previous image. This section has been left dry for two years without having been treated by the above of said preservation process.

2015.01.29

Berge Haueland have demonstrated to us how effective removes rust and other corrosion products from steel using an ultrasonic washer.

We let Berge test method on two springs from the bomb bay. These were cleaned in a tierra tech MOT - 75 ultrasonic washer. The result is impressive, and shows that the use of ultrasonic cleaning is an effective method for removing inter alia. rust from steel.

There is a wide range of ultrasonic cleaning units in use around the industry and in workshops, and it is not certain that it is necessary to use such a great device, as we got to test. One challenge is whether the device has space to accommodate the components that one wishes to purify. Furthermore, in different television sets have a different power and frequency of the ultrasonic generator. What these variables actually mean for a result, We currently do not experience to be able to say anything about.

Which cleaning chemical used is of great importance. We have developed a wide range of cleaning chemicals for use for the different types of materials and objects. One should probably be especially careful in the choice of cleaning chemicals if one wants to clean aluminum and other similar metals.

The detergent used for cleaning of the springs was Alkaline deruster-HD. Ultrasound Treatment was administered in 30 minutes. The bath temperature was 70 ° c. After the process in the ultrasonic cleaner was finished, were feathers placed in a washing machine. Here they lay submerged in Power Wash 30 minutes. The temperature here was 50 ° C. Such washing after cleaning in the ultrasonic cleaner is an important part of the process leading to the result we got.

After we got feathers back we let these lie submerged a few hours in Lanolin.

The springs before removal from the shelter.

The springs before removal from the shelter.

One of the springs after the treatment in the ultrasonic washer

One of the springs after the treatment in the ultrasonic washer

We have borrowed the following description of the technique from the Norwegian website; www.ultralydvasken.no:

"Cleaning with ultrasound is a proven technique that has been in use since the 60s. Ultrasonic Washing has superior efficacy when it comes to cleaning surfaces that are difficult to reach. Using appropriate detergent in combination with an ultrasonic washer will be possible to remove the dirt and unwanted particles, which are impossible to wash away. Moreover, saving a lot of time by using an ultrasonic washing in contrast to other cleaning methods.

Ultrasonic cleaner stock high-frequency sound waves that creates cavitation in detergent, which in turn makes the formation of small microscopic vacuum bubbles which implode under vigorous energy development.

The most common frequency ranges used in ultrasonic cleaning is 28khz and 40KHz. The difference is that 28khz stock larger and more “aggressive” vakuumbobler, while 40kHz stock less and “kinder” vakuumbobler. When cleaning of parts such as e.g.. motor or by paintstripping, can 28khz be right choice, while 40kHz is more suitable for cleaning e.g.. jewelry, gull, optics, etc..

Applications for an ultrasound sinks are many. Electronics, PCB, mechanics, metals, Gun parts, nozzles, carburetors, motorblokker, cylinder head, tattoo equipment, empty cartridges, malingssprøyter, jewelry, gull, glasses, optics, lenses, clockwork, dental equipment, laboratory equipment, glassrør, musical instruments, drilling equipment, charge air coolers, turbos, valves, etc.. In combination with the right chemicals can solve new challenges. "

2014.11.16

Today we have added a link to a comprehensive memorandum on the divers' efforts to raise Heinkel. Here you can in detail describes how this extensive and impressive operation was conducted. The link can be found under the tab History and salvage. You can also access this report using the link below the picture.

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Link to report on the raising of plane;

You will get the report out as a word format document that will probably add as an icon below the screen.

2014.09.29

Heinkel 115 The project wanted to find a work effectively to clean surfaces, and at the same time be able to take care of equipment and varnished surfaces. We have previously attempted to blow surfaces using dry ice. There has since been a substantial interest, and a good attendance from the academic communities from several of the major museums in the district. The experience we got, meant that the steering committee for Heinkel 115 The project required to continue the experiment by cleaning the cockpit and nose section inside by means of dry ice. It was therefore made contact with a local company that has the equipment and expertise to such work.

We have this week been visited by the company Blast- It Egersund. They bring their experience, and an equipment appropriate to the task, work a few days to clean the cockpit section inside. The result shows that blasting with dry ice works well for this type of work. The method also provides excellent opportunities to clean up under, between and behind places with difficult access, like for example. ribs.

It used a small blow gun to work
It used a small blow gun to work

Have a box appears, built between the brown, who cleaned with dry ice
Have a box appears, next to the brown, who cleaned with dry ice

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2014.04.30 Photo documentation, referansepunkter, filing and storage.

This was the day for photo documentation of what lay where inside the nose and cockpit section. It is important that we have secured a solid photographic material of how things have looked, before dismantling begins. We're shooting areas from spinning to spinning, from bottom to top, and gladly back down, to ensure that every detail is depicted. To ensure the identification of where pictures are taken, used Heinkel factory's own numbering system for the various frames. In this system, called frames, from the front of the nose section and rear bulkhead against cockpit, with the Roman numerals I to V. From the front bulkhead, cockpit section and the rear bulkhead against the center section, used the Arabic numerals 1 to 6.

The bombardier's hydraulic opening and closing valve for bomb hatches. The valve is located on the starboard side when spun II.

The bombardier's hydraulic opening and closing valve for bomb hatches. The valve is located on the starboard side when spun II.

All items before disassembly in addition be thoroughly photographed so that one can later get back to where they have been placed, and how they were mounted. Position is referred to which side and which(t) spinning equipment has been installed on. The parts are marked with the unique tag numbers, to be detected in a paper form.

The control is positioned on the starboard side , between ribs IV- V, and was used to eject the torpedo

They are then again thoroughly photographed to document both state, and how part is built. The images are then recorded in the same paper form, and since stored with traceability to the tag, spun and date for dismantling. The whole thing is then recorded in an Excel form to secure an overall traceability at.

The starboard side between the ribs 5- 6. As her bl.a. rear part of the mechanism for starting nødutpumping fuel, lower part of the seat support and review Hot air from exhaust manifold.

The starboard side between the ribs 5- 6. As her bl.a. rear part of the mechanism for starting nødutpumping fuel, lower part of the seat support and review Hot air from exhaust manifold.

Parts that are taken out are stored in a smaller water tanks in anticipation of a thorough assessment and conservation. Some parts are put thoroughly with Lanolin and stored dry.

Conservation of kroppsrør and stumped

Late autumn 2013 becomes the tail section lifted out of the water vessel and taken into the workshop for conservation. Jærmuseet have set conservator Eirik Aarebrot available for this big job. He is accompanied by Roar Henriksen from Venneforeningen. They work in time until after the turn with internal and external cleaning. When the parts are inserted with Lanolin, and since inserted as part of the exhibit.

Hale section now stands in the exhibition
Hale section now stands in the exhibition

Eirik Aarebrot made after the work its own report which you can read by following this link: Report on the preservation of the tail section He 115